Arthur

The ARTHUR (ARTillery Hunting Radar) is a highly mobile, fully coherent radar system designed to locate enemy artillery assets and to direct own fire missions. Its top-notch radar technology is reflected in its simple antenna whose easy control and short preparation for deployment or movement guarantees a high level of operability of the entire system. The 2.1 x 1.2 m antenna, which both transmits and receives signals, is mounted on a turntable which permits the antenna’s traverse and elevation to be mechanically controlled and automatically compensates for any terrain unevenness within a + 7°/- 7° range.

With a transmitting pulse power of up to 25kW and a transmitted sub-pulse duration of 320ns, the radar is extremely accurate even when tracking an incoming round, although the effective radar cross-section of, for example, an artillery round is hardly larger than a 20-crown coin.

The radar is capable of tracking eight projectiles simultaneously; as the process takes only a few seconds, it can evaluate up to a hundred targets per minute. The operating range of the radar is 20, 30 or 40 km within a 90° sector, which is further divided into 16 sub-sectors. Depending on the task, the operator can switch the sub-sectors on and off one by one, shorten or extend them, or assign different locate-and-track or fire control modes to each of them.

Using the information on enemy assets provided by intelligence-gathering teams, the system can be fed with tactical input data which the ARTHUR makes use of to automatically determine the number of firing enemy artillery systems and the number of fired rounds, which are subsequently used to select an appropriate counter-battery firing mode. Thanks to tactical zones, the system can warn friendly units about enemy fire strikes, cooperate within defined coordination zones, or generate a fire mission requirement.

The data needed to conduct a counter-battery fire mission is transferred to an interface computer and subsequently, via the ASPRO Fire Control System, to the artillery system that will carry out the mission. The ARTHUR is thus able to direct fire even in low-visibility conditions (fog, heavy rain or heavy snowfall). It is best to use three ARTHUR systems to cover the area that is to be monitored. This arrangement allows the systems to be placed where they have the best “view” of enemy assets and also reduces the chance they will be spotted by the enemy.

Through the Ministry of Defence of the Czech Republic and thanks to the ARTHUR radar systems, the Czech Army has become one of today’s best-equipped armies in this respect. The three ARTHUR systems and a classroom simulator are now in the inventory of the 13th Artillery Regiment in Jince. Saab provides continuous and comprehensive support of the systems, including deliveries of all spare parts that are needed. Under the logistic support contract, the support will continue till the end of 2016.